Two Years of the Journal of Digital Humanities

Journal of Digital Humanities

Seven issues. Nearly 90 works by over 120 authors and a half dozen institutions. More than 600 pages. Who says that there is no scholarship on the open web? With the first two volumes of the Journal of Digital Humanities (JDH) we have offered an overlay journal for this diverse and emerging field, sourced almost entirely from scholarship on the open web in the previous six months. This post provides background on some frequently asked questions about the production of JDH content and issues.

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Journal of Digital Humanities 2.3: Local Programs, Global Audiences Now Available

Journal of Digital Humanities

The seventh issue of the Journal of Digital Humanities is now available online, with options to download as epub, PDF, or iBook.

In the scholarly communication ecosystem, lectures and conference roundtables offer valuable opportunities to share one’s on-going research and reflections with an engaged audience. Although social media, online conference programs, and slideshare sites now boost the signal of scholarly work, talks at conferences are still often limited by the time and place of their delivery. In this seventh issue of the Journal of Digital Humanities, each featured piece translated what began as an oral presentation at a scholarly conference into another form for a wider audience on the open web. In addition, we are proud to debut a new genre of gray literature in this first of two installments of posters originally presented at DH2013, the annual, international conference of the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations. Our goal was to improve the visibility of these already peer-reviewed works by offering a sustainable, open publication venue that benefits both those who were able to attend DH2013 and those who were not. As you read the features and peruse the poster gallery in this issue, we hope that you find new insights, new tools, or new approaches that are currently in development and of lasting value to you.

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PressForward at the Museum Computer Network

Slides are now available for project director Joan Fragaszy Troyano and RRCHNM colleague Sheila Brennan’s presentation at the “New Approaches to Museum Publishing” panel at the Museum Computer Network meeting in Montreal on November 23, 2013.

View Slides Here.

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Digital Humanities Now (and Then)

Over the past four years, Digital Humanities Now (DHNow) has used a variety of approaches to aggregating, reviewing, selecting, and disseminating scholarly content from the open web. By experimenting with DHNow, we are developing methodologies and technologies to facilitate community-sourced publications beyond digital humanities. In this post we detail some of the methods and technologies we have used along the way and our wishlist and plans for the future.

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PressForward at the Western Humanities Alliance Annual Meeting

Slides are now available for PressForward project director Joan Fragaszy Troyano’s presentation for the “New Publishing Tools, Aggregators and Presses” panel at the Western Humanities Alliance Annual Meeting in San Diego, California on November 1, 2013.

View slides here.

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Journal of Digital Humanities 2.2: Expanding Communities of Practice

Journal of Digital Humanities

The sixth issue of the Journal of Digital Humanities is now available online, with options to download as epub, PDF, or iBook.

The materials featured in this sixth issue of the Journal of Digital Humanities expose “communities of practice” in digital humanities beyond the constellations of people and institutions directly engaged in experimental and digitally-inflected scholarship. Communities of practice, socially constructed groups that form around shared interests or crafts, often generate forms of tacit knowledge that circulate informally. What distinguishes the works herein is their articulation of tacit knowledge produced during the course of project development. While they originate in diverse sites of digital humanities scholarship, these project strategically engage contingent audiences. Furthermore, each details conscious decisions that tailor its approach to collaborative creation and implementation.

Read the rest of the sixth issue of the Journal of Digital Humanities here.

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PressForward welcomes Stephanie Westcott!

We are very excited to have Stephanie Westcott join the PressForward team. Stephanie has worked in the publishing and communication fields in addition to teaching American history for the University of Wisconsin. Stephanie is an historian of popular culture, and received her PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2012. At RRCHNM, Stephanie will help manage Digital Humanities Now and Journal of Digital Humanities, as well as conduct outreach for the PressForward plugin and project.

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Reader Feedback on the Journal of Digital Humanities

Journal of Digital Humanities

We asked our readers what they valued about the Journal of Digital Humanities. Below we share some of the feedback from our readers as well as statistics about the journal’s reach and readership.

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Journal of Digital Humanities 2.1: Topic Modeling Now Available

Journal of Digital Humanities

The fifth issue of the Journal of Digital Humanities is now available online, with options to download as epub, PDF, or iBook.

The advancement of scholarship relies on the timely communication of questions, methods, results, and reflections. The iterative publications Digital Humanities Now and the Journal of Digital Humanities are intended to facilitate this process. DHNow surfaces and distributes the conversations weekly in order to invite participation and feedback. The Journal of Digital Humanities then identifies the conversations that need a stable landing on which to pause and reflect before continuing onward.

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Filtering Scholarly Writing from the Open Web using Active Learning SVM

In this report Xin Guan, a graduate student of computer science at George Mason University, introduces the Support Vector Machine (SVM) program he developed to identify valuable pieces from the large pool of potential content for Digital Humanities Now. Those interested in the concepts and logistics behind the classifier program will be interested to read his explanation of the Active Learning method of Machine Learning he used.

Report

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